The fighting in South Ossetia in 2008 between Russian soldiers and Georgian insurgents – an ill-advised eruption on both sides – left another terrible mark on the already strained political relationship.

This verbatim documentary devised by Alecky Blythe with five actors from that notable Georgian company, the Rustaveli Theatre (who visited the international festival over thirty years ago) annotates the survival of refugees from their northern homelands.

­­With sur-titles, photo projections, and impassioned music, we have telling snapshots of life in the refugee camps as normal activity is resumed in the hairdresser’s, in bread shop, at kitchen tables.

Blythe employs her usual method of playing the recorded soundtrack through the earphones of the actors who reproduce that text exactly, with every intonation.

I’ve never understood the point of this, but they seem not to be taking much notice of the ear-feed anyway. What does come across is the fierce Georgian spirit of optimism: nature renews itself despite everything.