Venue: Tron Theatre
Where: Glasgow

Chances are you may be reading this review from the comfort of your own home – be that 25 High Street, 48 Green Lane, or perhaps even a certain 66a Church Road.

Realise it or not, but nestling amongst the bricks and mortar will be a cache of emotion. Fondness for a dwelling can flourish over time and that is what stand-up comedian Daniel Kitson, a 25-year-old winner of the Perrier Award eight years ago, articulates as he delivers his own personal 'lament made of memories and kept in suitcases’ whilst sitting surrounded by illuminated baggage – both metaphorical and physical.

On the surface this is a personal piece, billed as a break-up show for the longest relationship of his life: that with his old Crystal Palace flat. Everyday chores, tasks and pleasures which once took place within the property – from meals to sleep and sex – are conveyed in a wonderfully captivating manner and strike a perfect balance between the wistfully appealing and the humorously poignant.

Yet what makes this play unique and memorable is the fact that it raises questions about the cash-based civilisation which we are also forced to call 'home'. Indeed, Kitson reveals much throughout his monologue, relayed in a mix of anger, wit and melancholy which transmits effectively from stage to audience.

Kitson is endearing, providing a performance which is stylishly simplistic – shaped and trimmed in equal measure to reflect his love of language. At times, his reverie and reminiscence appear to lull the audience into a state of reflective nostalgia.

Whether or not you enjoy where you live – or have lived – as much as Kitson obviously did 66a Church Road, this pleasing production will make you think about the walls which surround you, in more ways than one, and is well worth watching on that basis alone.

- Jamie Kempton.