Jack Thorne is right on target with teenage angst.

With a proven track record of credits including TV’s Skins and Shameless, Bunny is a dynamic, captivating piece exploring the real world of adolescents struggling to find themselves in the 21st century.

Now on tour after winning the Scotsman Fringe First Award at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, the nabokov and Escalator production is a breathless 60 minutes brush with the tour de force which is Luton’s disenfranchised teen Katie who can’t decide if she is or isn’t ‘bovvered’.

Rosie Wyatt (Love Love Love) is excellent. Her monologue is paced superbly, packing the tale of the ice cream accident and subsequent manhunt with aside commentary of universal teen dilemmas – the payback to adults for being who they are or humiliating incidents; the swinging aspirations of university and the factory floor; the raging hormones and burgeoning sexuality; elusive sense of identity and living in suspense refusing to take control over what happens next.

Katie is a typical 18-year-old on the cusp of adulthood: keen to grow up quick but afraid of responsibility; insecure and confident by turns; quick to condemn but slow to take the lead: and, overall, just desperate to fit in. A veritable rabbit in the headlights.

A fast and furious monologue is illustrated by Ian William Galloway’s simple video design and Jenny Turner’s wonderful cartoon background which gives just enough relief from the verbal diarrhoea to enhance rather than distract.

Amusing, poignant, bang on the money real – catch it if you can.