Hull Truck’s new building on Ferensway has been presented with a Good Mark Award by the city’s Civic Society. The awards were established in 1965 to celebrate and encourage good conservation practice and new building design.

In presenting the award, Malcolm Sharman, the Good Mark Secretary, praised Hull Truck as an “outstanding achievement” that was already “an important part of (Hull’s) historical landscape”. Sharman also remarked on the “improvement to the quality of dramatic experience for the local community” made by the theatre.

The Civic Society praised the building’s accessible location and easy to navigate layout, as well as its environmental achievements and success in maintaining the atmosphere of its old Spring Street venue.

Hull Truck’s operations director, Paul Marshall, who was present to collect the award alongside creative director, John Godber and artistic director, Gareth Tudor Price, said: “A great deal of thought and hard work went into the planning of this theatre and it is fantastic to see that reap rewards with accolades such as these.”

Marshall added that “recognition from the local community is particularly important to us as obviously these are the people who use the building and whose support we rely on for our ongoing success”.

This is one of several recent awards received by the theatre, including RIBA’s Building of the Year White Rose Award and the Brick Award for Best Public Building in Britain. (See News, 3 Nov 2009)

Founded by Mike Bradwell in 1971, the theatre company started life in the back of a truck before moving into its first permanent home in Spring Street in 1983. It closed its doors in February 2009 ahead of the move to Ferensway. The new building, which cost £15 million and was designed by Wright & Wright Architects, opened in April 2009. It incorporates a 440-seat main theatre, 134-seat studio theatre and an education space.

Hull Civic Society was established in 1964, with an aim to represent people who wished to make suggestions for improving the city’s environment. A charitable organisation, it now works towards achieving high standards of architecture in the city.

- by Hannah Giles