When a play like ENRON pulls into the regions with such glowing plaudits, it understandably leads to high expectations. Although, there is much to admire in this true tale of greed and corruption, it ends up being a play that you like but not necessarily, love.

The subject matter is perfect for the stage, as you could not make it up and focuses on the infamous financial history scandal and its wider implications. We witness 9/11, men in suits making decisions about our money, the devious dealings which fooled Wall Street and how money markets can rise one minute and fluctuate the next.

The problem though is that however inventive director, Rupert Goold tries to be, some of the delivery ends up as thrilling as death-by-PowerPoint. The musical numbers bring the show to life as they are delivered with wit and sardonic asides by the gifted ensemble cast. But, beneath all the smoke and mirrors is a play which seems unsure of it's overriding message.

Jeffrey Skilling is well played by Corey Johnson and this actor does imbue him with bucketloads of charm. That though, is part of the problem, these characters seem too damn nice - so when their downfall arrives - you feel quite distant, as it removes any finger of blame.

Anthony Ward's stunning set and Mark Henderson's lavish lighting illuminates a world where dog eats dog, but the characterisations that Lucy Prebble presents us with are more Andrex puppy than Rottweiler.

Nice visuals, clever songs and some sharp humour aside, ENRON left me feeling like one of their shareholders; shortchanged.