‘Do not define me. You cannot read my soul.’ Through Bob Kingdom, Truman Capote speaks from beyond the grave. The short guy with the high voice acknowledges his death early on in the performance, but it’s a minor point; his words still count, and he remains seemingly convinced of his own magnificence (despite his lack of a Pulitzer prize - much to his chagrin).

Kingdom’s performance is captivating whether you know much about Capote or not. For him, gossip is a type of power, and scandal is always delicious – even if you don’t know the people involved. Essentially, Kingdom’s depiction of Capote is one of a man who deigns to speak to us and yet is excruciatingly insecure. At times he comes across as a bored, bitchy boy, but really, he just ‘told the truth like every good child should’. This show is poignant because it never tries to be tragic: it is an acerbic account of the reality of celebrity.

- Miranda Fay Thomas