Migration comes naturally to many species. Emigration is often seen as a good thing – a chance for people to better themselves, even to save their lives. Immigration, however, can be something altogether less positive. It opens up the proverbial can of worms, and these can be lethal as well as downright unpleasant.

Croatian playwright Tena Štivičić presents us with all three viewpoints in Invisible, which she has scripted in English and which Transport director Douglas Rintoul has cast using European as well as British actors. Anton (Krystian Godlewski is a refugee from a particularly vicious bout of ethnic cleansing. Lara Anna Elijasz) wants a better life, and is prepared to work at anything to provide it.

Then there are Ann (Bridgitta Roy) and her husband Felix (Jon Foster). They’re British, middle-class and well-to-do with a nice home (courtesy of his high-powered marketing job) and a vibrant social circle. The girl who cleans their house and the man who cleans the office windows are invisible in their minimalist world . Until, one night on the town, Felix precipitates a tragedy.

It’s a production which blends the stylised with the natural. You’re conscious of the actors waiting outside the neon-framed main stage, sitting quietly or dressing for the next scene. That doesn’t distract from the intensity of the emotions on display, which are very well articulated by the players, most of whom ake more than one part.

Disembodied voices punctuate the action as authority – for the most part pettifogging – takes its toll from those so desperately trying to navigate the shoals of official sharks which waylay them. Mark Jax is moving as the patriarch refusing to leave the house he loves and nastily credible as Gerry, the businessman with twisted priorities. Gracy Goldman and Liam Bergin complete the cast.