This war time story set in the summer of 1943 tells the tale of seven children whose lives are changed dramatically one day when a tragic accident occurs. Dennis Potter wrote this classic childhood story in 1979 and is told entirely from the friends' point of view. There is always a little uncertainty when adults take on the roles of children, but Potter leads the way in that all of his characters are kids; not one grown up in sight.
 
As you would expect from a group of seven year olds, there is much messing about and general frivolity, indeed you have a hard time keeping your eye on this super fit cast as the stage is built to resemble a sloping hill (great for rolling down) and playing aeroplanes. Behind is a white background that is used to project images of trees to place the children in the woods, and provides atmosphere.
 
All of these actors are worthy of praise to take on the task of playing children and as they are hardly off stage, to keep up the energy needed to complete the sixty-minute piece, but complete it they do. Christopher Price plays troublemaker Peter. Through his physicality and speech, he takes on the full behaviour that is quite uncanny to watch at times. Also Adrian Grove's portrayal in his character Donald is upsetting too at points. Donald is the outsider of the group, picked on by the others he spends a lot of time on his own. It is quite touching to see how emotional he becomes which only helps to build up to the crucial last minutes of the play.
 
Blue Remembered Hills
reminds us of endless summers and lost youth, but also how quickly it can all be taken away. Fast, furious, and fun this tale is recommended for all.
 
- Janie Phillips