Based in the Golden Age of the 1940s, a romance unfolds between big time movie star, Sadie Strauss (Flavia Cacace) and her handsome lover, Tony Deluca (Vincent Simone). A hilarious Dick Tracey style spoof, with humour reminiscent of Airplane, Dance 'til Dawn is filled with sharp comic timing, classic and modern tunes and innovative dances that will take your breath away. The follow-up to their debut hit Midnight Tango, this is a dramatised dance show, directed and co-choreographed by Karen Bruce, who adds a Hollywood finish to Simone and Cacace's charismatic ballroom routines.

As the former Strictly Come Dancing stars take to the stage, the crowd cheer and the show springs into immediate action. Fast and furious Charleston, Quickstep and Jive routines, combined with sultry Tangos and smooth Foxtrots, and not forgetting the romantic Rumbas and Waltzes, the story leads the audience through a showcase of exciting and poignant dance routines.

With the help of a stunning set, big band and beautiful period costume, Dance ‘Til Dawn transports you back in time. Performed by a chorus of outstanding dancers and singers, and Vincent and Flavia themselves in non-vocal roles, flawless footwork and transcendent choreography make the show a truly uplifting experience.

Throughout the performance there is difficultly hearing the singers, especially the female vocalists, over the big band numbers; and occasionally the same difficulties arise when The Voice (Teddy Kempner) is narrating the plot, but this doesn't detract too much from the show itself. A special mention should here be given to Kempner and his female comedy partner Abbie Osmon, as Lana Clemenza. The pair's comic timing is beyond seamless and Osmon's vocals are to die for.

There is no other word to describe Vincent and Flavia's performance than heavenly. Far from their comfort zone of the Argentine Tango, the partners perform an array of ballroom dance styles, with that added West End sparkle. Their performance of ‘Stand By Me', brings a whole new meaning to ‘Cell Bock Tango' and with elements of Tango, Rumba and other influences, the routine has audience members welling up. At the complete other end of the spectrum is their Quickstep to Paolo Nutini's ‘Pencil Full of Lead', in which the cast use slapstick to its full potential, having the audience rocking in their seats.

Ending with what they know best, the dance duo's Argentine Tango finale is worth full marks on its own. Slick, sexy and awe-inspiring the two move perfectly in time with each other. Sweeping effortlessly across the stage they create an explosive ending to a fun-filled and fast-paced circus. Get your tickets now, before they sell out!

- Hannah Sweetnam